It is my honor and pleasure to announce the publication of a collective volume edited by yours truly:

Michael Langlois (ed.), The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls, Contributions to Biblical Exegesis and Theology 94, Leuven, Peeters, 2019.

“Seventy years after their discovery, the Dead Sea Scrolls continue to shed light on the Samaritan Pentateuch.The textual features, orthography, script, variant readings and even theology of the Samaritan Pentateuch have parallels in various manuscripts found in the Judaean desert and copied during the Second Temple period. The fertile encounter of Samaritan and Dead Sea Scrolls studies has yielded this exceptional volume, featuring twelve contributions by some of the most respected scholars gathered at the University of Strasbourg on May 26–27, 2016. They cover such issues as scribal and editorial practices, political and religious history, textual editions and versions, palaeography and linguistics — with provocative studies challenging classical theories on the origin of the Gerizim tenth commandment or the date of the earliest Dead Sea Scrolls.”

This volume publishes the proceedings of the international conference held in Strasbourg in 2016. Here is the table of contents:

Magnar KARTVEIT. Scholars’ Assessments of the Relationship between the Pre-Samaritan Texts and the Samaritan Pentateuch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Emanuel TOV. From Popular Jewish LXX-SP Texts to Separate Sectarian Texts: Insights from the Dead Sea Scrolls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Michaël N. VAN DER MEER. Exclusion and Expansion: Harmonisations in the Samaritan Penta- teuch, Pre-Samaritan Pentateuchal Manuscripts and Non-Pentateuchal Manuscripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Stefan SCHORCH. The So-Called Gerizim Commandment in the Samaritan Pentateuch 77
Gary N. KNOPPERS†. Altared States: The Altar Laws in the Samaritan and Jewish Penta- teuchs,andTheirEarlyInterpreters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Benjamin ZIEMER. A Stemma for Deuteronomy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Innocent HIMBAZA. Looking at the Samaritan Pentateuch from Qumran: Legal Material of Leviticus and Deuteronomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Jonathan BEN-DOV. Text Duplications between Higher and Lower Criticism: Num 20-21 and Deut 2-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Abraham TAL. Do the Samaritan Pentateuch and 1QIsaa Follow the Same Model? 243
Michael LANGLOIS. Dead Sea Scrolls Palaeography and the Samaritan Pentateuch . . 255
Christian STADEL. Variegation in Second Temple Period Hebrew: Passive t-Stems, the in Samaritan Hebrew and in the אפוא Demonstrative Series, and הלז DeadSeaScrolls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Jan JOOSTEN. Biblical Interpretation in the Samareitikon as Exemplified in Anonymous Readings in Leviticus Attested in M′. . . . . . . . . . . . . 313

If you are interested in this volume, please visit the publisher’s website.

Besides the edition of the volume as a whole, I also contributed a chapter:

Michael Langlois, “Dead Sea Scrolls Palaeography and the Samaritan Pentateuch,” in The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls, ed. by Michael Langlois, Contributions to Biblical Exegesis and Theology 94, Leuven, Peeters, 2019, p. 255‑285.

Enjoy! 🙂

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